Cheers to Sparkling Wine!

Cheers to Sparkling Wine!

Not just for celebrations anymore, sparkling wine is a sensational choice year-round. From Cava and Prosecco to Crémant and Champagne, bubbly is available in a variety of styles and price points from producers around the world. It’s superb for sipping solo, and with its fresh, fruity flavour, it also pairs perfectly with everyday favourites, like grilled fish, french fries and buttery popcorn.



Fast Facts

Mix it!

Terrific for sipping, sparkling wine also brings flavour and fizz to an array of cocktails.

GET THE RECIPES

Prosecco is #1

This Italian favourite is now the bestselling sparkling wine in the world by volume, surpassing Champagne for the first time in 2018.

SHOP NOW
All Shapes & Sizes

All Shapes & Sizes

Bubbly is now available in cans or with crown caps instead of corks — ideal for easy entertaining.


How It's Made  

All sparkling wine is created by introducing enough carbon dioxide to wine to make it bubble. These are the two most popular ways to make a quality sparkler.

Traditional Method

Traditional Method

This process involves mixing dry still wine with sugar and yeast before bottling. During a second bottle fermentation, carbon dioxide dissolves in the wine, creating bubbles, and yeast forms a sediment called “lees” that gradually releases flavours into the wine. Lasting months or years, this key part of the aging process creates the complex tastes found in Champagne, Crémant and Cava.

Tank Method

Tank Method

Used to make fresh, fruity styles of sparkling wine, including Prosecco and Sekt, the tank method starts the same way as the traditional: dry still wine is mixed with sugar and yeast and left to ferment in the bottle. But then the wine is transferred to a pressurized tank for the second fermentation, before it’s filtered and finally bottled under pressure to retain the bubbles.


A World of Bubbles  

There are almost as many styles and varietals used to make sparkling wine as there are regions producing it. These are some of the best known.

Cava

Cava

Crafted using the traditional method, Cava is primarily produced in the Penedès region of Spain from a blend of grapes, including Macabeo, Parellada and Xarel-lo. Garnacha and Monastrell are used in rosé versions. Light, fruity and perfumed, it’s an excellent match for grilled shellfish or crisp tempura asparagus.

Champagne

Champagne

The world’s most famous sparkling wine is produced in the Champagne region of France, usually from Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier grapes, alone or in blends, using the traditional method. The result: a complex wine with fine, persistent bubbles and a pronounced toastiness. Pair it with sushi, popcorn, barbecued salmon or creamy cheeses, like Brie and Camembert.

Crémant

Crémant

Most French sparkling wines made outside the Champagne region are labelled “Crémant” — Crémant d’Alsace, Crémant de Loire and Crémant Bourgogne, for example. They’re produced using the same traditional method as Champagne but can include a variety of different grapes, such as Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris and Chenin Blanc. Try Crémant with french fries, calamari or avocado toast.

Prosecco

Prosecco

This fruity, floral sparkler is named for the Prosecco region where it’s made in Northeast Italy, just outside Venice. It’s produced using the tank method, which results in a light, fizzy wine with toasted hazelnut, melon and green apple flavours that pair well with everything from a charcuterie plate to potato chips to grilled peaches.

Sekt

Sekt

Germans are the world’s largest consumers of sparkling wine and, not surprisingly, they produce some excellent bubbly, called Sekt. Made from Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Riesling and Pinot Blanc grapes, using the traditional method, Sekt from quality regions is often labelled “German Sekt b.A.” or “Winzersekt.” Dry and fresh, it’s an excellent partner for a Thai yellow curry.

Asti

Asti

From the Piedmont region of Italy comes this slightly sweet, low-alcohol sparkling wine made from Moscato Bianco grapes. Meant to be enjoyed soon after it's bottled, Asti is often creamy with pronounced honey and citrus flavours, and white flower aromas. It’s typically served with dessert and goes especially well with hazelnut cake.


Champagne vs. Sparkling Wine

Champagne vs. Sparkling Wine

To call itself Champagne, a sparkler must be made in the Champagne region of Northeast France. All other bubblies are considered sparkling wines.

Understanding the Label

Understanding the Label

The term “Brut” on a sparkling wine label indicates the level of dryness — 1.2% or 12 g/L of residual sugar, to be exact. For extra-dry bubbly, look for "Extra Brut" on the label.