Rotisserie BBQ

Once you start using the rotisserie attachment on your barbecue, it’s awfully hard to stop. “A rotisserie does the hard work for you,” says our recipe developer Christopher St. Onge, “letting you pretty much forget about the cooking until it’s ready. All-over heat ensures that even the sides of poultry are crisped and, because there are no contact points with searing hot metal, burnt and bitter flavours are virtually non-existent.” Both gas and charcoal barbecues can be adapted for a rotisserie, giving you the closest thing yet to trouble-free backyard cooking.

Huli-Huli Chicken & Pineapple

Spit-Roasted Fennel with Anchovies & Burrata

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Striploin Roast & Smoky Chimichurri

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Herb & Garlic Pork Loin with Crackling

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Summer BBQ Picks

What goes well with most things off the grill? Try these bright versatile wines and a precisely balanced, people-pleasing ale.

Mill St. Tankhouse Ale

One of Mill St.’s great early successes, Tankhouse still impresses. Maltiness and hopping are finely balanced and also nicely restrained. This ale tastes less like citrus or pine needles—and more like beer.

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Redstone Brickyard Riesling

Medium-bodied and just off-dry, this intense Niagara benchland Riesling is full of tangy citrus, apple and peach flavours. Bold enough for barbecue—and the 10% alcohol per volume (ABV) makes it a lovely wine for lunchtime.

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Bersano Costalunga Barbera D'Asti

Here’s a useful red that’s light on its feet and has food-friendly acidity but still packs enough personality to handle a steak. Dry and admirably well balanced, it shows a hint of smoke under the red cherry.

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